The use of symbolism and realism in kate chopins the awakening

Taking place in s, Edna tries to detach herself from the oppressive social norms and seek self-discovery. The motif of birds represents Edna during the stages of her awakenings. Towards the beginning of the novel, Edna reflects on the differences between herself and the other women of society.

The use of symbolism and realism in kate chopins the awakening

The Use of Birds as Symbols in The Awakening by Lori Dorrin The Awakening by Kate Chopin is a truly enlightening novel about a young woman who begins to really live her life for herself, breaking out of the various barriers of society and family. The birds that appear throughout the novel are the most intriguing symbols; they are used many different ways, to mean many different things, and to portray various emotions and situations.

As the novel begins, Chopin likens Edna to a bird in a gilded cage. Edna is not free, but that is okay because she has not yet begun to see what life has to offer; she has not yet begun to awaken.

Edna cannot fly away to freedom; she is tied by social constraints and especially by her family. Chopin helps the reader to understand fully the pressure society and family have put upon Edna, causing her to feel she will never be able to fly away to freedom.

Edna is not a particularly motherly woman, unlike most women of her social circles. The use of birds is slipped in here also. While Edna does not hate her children, she comes to realize the extent that they tie her down, and she feels that she has given up her life for them.

As the novel progresses, Edna realizes she has friends who at times know her better than herself and are always willing to give advice. If Edna is to defy her society and deny her family, she must be strong, and she must not care what anyone else thinks if she is going to make herself happy.

Unfortunately, it seems that Edna is not as strong as Mademoiselle Reisz thinks, or maybe it is that she is stronger. When Edna realizes that Robert loves her but is too frightened to be with her, she cannot take the pain and sorrow she feels.

She has been awakened to see what her life has become: As Edna goes back to the place where she had begun her awakening, she walks to the beach and sees a bird who is hurt. Edna sees death as her real freedom, her final awakening, and while it seems like the cowardly way out, it has to take courage to end life.

Edna chooses death over a life she cannot fully live. Work Cited Chopin, Kate. The Norton Anthology of American Literature.In, Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Edna Pontellier is both a mother and wife, but she does not see those roles as a blessing, but rather a burden.

She is searching for personal happiness and freedom outside of the expectations society has for her. Kate Chopin was born in St.

The use of symbolism and realism in kate chopins the awakening

Louis, Missouri, to a socially prominent, financially secure family. Her mother, Eliza Faris, descended from French Creole ancestors, and her father, Thomas O'Flaherty, was an Irish immigrant who had made his fortune as a merchant in St.

Louis. The Use of Birds as Symbols in The Awakening by Lori Dorrin The Awakening by Kate Chopin is a truly enlightening novel about a young woman who begins to really live her life for herself, breaking out of the various barriers of society and family.

The use of symbolism and realism in kate chopins the awakening

The Awakening by Kate Chopin was written during the ’s and was published in the year of During this time, the novel struck controversial subjects using a strong feminist tone, which underlined Chopin’s views on sex, marriage, and women of that period.

quotes from Kate Chopin: 'The voice of the sea speaks to the soul.', 'She wanted something to happen - something, anything: she did not know what.', and 'Perhaps it is better to wake up after all, even to suffer, rather than to remain a dupe to illusions all one's life.'.

Use of Symbolism in Chopin's The Awakening The Awakening is a novel full of symbolism; within each narrative segment there is often a central and powerful symbol that serves to add meaning to the text and to underline some .

American Passages - Unit Regional Realism: Authors